Breast Cancer affects both men and women and can be of many types. Their prevalence in women is more than men, however, they do affect men. Breast Cancer in men are classified into following types:

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)

In DCIS (also recognized as intraductal carcinoma), tumor cells form in the breast ducts but do not cultivate through the walls of the ducts into the fatty tissue of the breast or multiply outside the breast. DCIS accounts for about 1 in 10 cases of breast cancer in men. It is usually cured with a surgical procedure.

Infiltrating (or invasive) Ductal Carcinoma (IDC)

This kind of breast cancer breaks through the wall of the duct and multiplies through the fatty tissue of the breast. At this point, it can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. At least 8 out of 10 male breast cancers are IDCs (alone or mixed with other types of invasive or in situ breast cancer). Since the male breast is much smaller than the female breast, all male breast cancers starts moderately close to the nipple, so they are more probable to spread to the nipple. This is different from Paget disease.

Infiltrating (or invasive) Lobular Carcinoma (ILC)

This kind of breast cancer starts in the breast lobules (compilation of cells that, in women, fabricate breast milk) and develops into the fatty tissue of the breast. ILC is uncommon in men, accounting for only about 2% of male breast cancers. This is for the reason that men do not frequently have much lobular tissue.

Lobular carcinoma In Situ (LCIS)

In LCIS, nonstandard cells form in the lobules, but they do not nurture into the fatty tissue of the breast or multiply outside the breast. Although LCIS from time to time are grouped with DCIS as a kind of non-invasive breast cancer, most breast specialists think it is a risk feature for budding breast cancer rather than a true non-invasive tumor. As with invasive lobular carcinoma, LCIS is very infrequent in men.

Paget disease of the nipple

This kind of breast cancer starts in the breast ducts and spreads to the nipple. It may also spread to the areola (the dark circle just about the nipple). The skin of the nipple frequently appears crusted, flaking, and red, with areas of burning, oozing, or bleeding. The fingertips can be used to perceive a probable lump inside the breast.  Paget disease may be connected with DCIS or with insightful ductal carcinoma. It accounts for about 1% of female breast cancers and a higher proportion of male breast cancers.