In other regions of the world, Liver cancer is very much common, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. Globally, liver cancer is the fifth most widespread cancer with a half a million people diagnosed each year. The number of people having liver cancer is rising both overseas and in the United States. It has been linked to damage and scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), even though the exact cause is still unknown.

In liver cancer cases, it is unsure why and how the cells of the liver are afflicted. However, it is found that damage to the liver can add to the risk of liver cancer such as cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is a medical condition in which the tissues of the liver get scarred and is unable to complete many of its normal functions. However, it is significant to point out many cases of cirrhosis do not direct to liver cancer.

Risk factors are as follows:

  • Viral hepatitis:

     Viral hepatitis is the biggest risk aspect for this kind of cancer. Hepatitis viruses are the ones that infect the liver.

  • Gender:

    Men are more likely to build up liver cancer than women.

  • Cirrhosis:

    This progressive and permanent condition develops scar tissue to form in the liver increasing the odds of developing liver cancer.

  • Environmental factors:

    Some environmental factors might also raise the risk of liver cancer, such as contact to certain chemicals or consumption of food contaminated with aflatoxin.

  • Excessive alcohol consumption:

    Consuming more than a reasonable quantity of alcohol every day over many years can lead to permanent liver damage and add to your risk of liver cancer.

  • Obesity:

    Having an unhealthy body mass index raises the risk of liver cancer.

Signs and symptoms usually do not show up until the later stages of the liver cancer, but at times they may show up earlier. If you go to your doctor when you first observe symptoms, your cancer might be diagnosed sooner, when treatment is most possible to be helpful. A few of the most general symptoms of liver cancer are:

  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Feeling very full after a small meal
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fever
  • A swollen liver
  • Jaundice
  • Deterioration of your condition if you have chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis